History

"Nothing could work to greater satisfaction than this crane, and under his persuasion it seemed to be instinct with life, reaching down its great finger and lifting the ponderous weights as a man would move a small object to any place about a table without the slightest apparent effort and placing them to an inch just where they were desired."

A reporter from The Argus observing the Thompson's Point crane moving a twenty-four ton driving wheel lathe

September 20, 1904

Brick South sits at the heart of Thompson’s Point, a small peninsula that juts into the Fore River at the Southern gateway to Portland, Maine. The site has a rich, industrial past centered around the shipping and railroad industries. It was the port terminus of the Cumberland and Oxford Canal in the 19th century and home of the Maine Central Railroad Shops in the early 20th; it served as a transfer point between rail cars and Portland’s busy shipyard and as a one-time state of the art hub for the repair of locomotive engines; it boasted Maine’s first electric crane.

The quick decline of rail and shipping led to the eventual demolition of many of the rail yard buildings. By the 1940’s, the once bustling area was relegated to industrial manufacturing and storage, and infrastructure fell into disrepair. Only two of the original rail yard buildings remain at the Northern end of the Point: the Car Repair Shop/Planing Mill and the Machine Shop.

But as Maine’s largest city has grown and been revitalized as a destination for tourists, creatives, immigrants, and entrepreneurs, Thompson’s Point has seen a reincarnation as a hub of creative activity: brewers, restauranteurs, designers, musicians, and makers have set up shop in the site’s once forgotten buildings. The Machine Shop has been refurbished as Brick South, a flexible multi-purpose venue that attracts a variety of events, from musical performances to trade shows to weddings and conferences. 

The Point's 2.25 million square feet of land at the burgeoning edge of the city is poised to become a new center for residential and commercial activity, with plans for a hotel, museum, recreational opportunities that take advantage of the water and trails nearby, homes, office spaces, and shared green space.

An event on Thompson’s Point is an event ahead of its time, at the edge of a vibrant new neighborhood, off the beaten path.

 

Travel

Thompson’s Point lies equidistant from the Portland International Jetport and the city center, convenient to Interstate 295, adjacent to the Amtrak Downeaster passenger train station and the Concord Coach Lines bus station with several daily routes to Boston and New York.

 

Booking

If you are interested in planning an event at Brick South or anywhere on Thompson’s Point, please fill out our Inquiry Form and we’ll be in touch about the details.

 
Machine Shop, Thompson's Point - 1924

Machine Shop, Thompson's Point - 1924

Lumber Shed, Thompson's Point - 1924

Lumber Shed, Thompson's Point - 1924

Gas Factory, Thompson's Point - 1924

Gas Factory, Thompson's Point - 1924

 

History

Brick South sits at the heart of Thompson’s Point, a small peninsula that juts into the Fore River at the Southern gateway to Portland, Maine. The site has a rich, industrial past centered around the shipping and railroad industries. It was the port terminus of the Cumberland and Oxford Canal in the 19th century and home of the Maine Central Railroad Shops in the early 20th; it served as a transfer point between rail cars and Portland’s busy shipyard and as a one-time state of the art hub for the repair of locomotive engines; it boasted Maine’s first electric crane.

"Nothing could work to greater satisfaction than this crane, and under his persuasion it seemed to be instinct with life, reaching down its great finger and lifting the ponderous weights as a man would move a small object to any place about a table without the slightest apparent effort and placing them to an inch just where they were desired."

A reporter from The Argus observing the Thompson's Point crane moving a twenty-four ton driving wheel lathe

September 20, 1904

The quick decline of rail and shipping led to the eventual demolition of many of the rail yard buildings. By the 1940’s, the once bustling area was relegated to industrial manufacturing and storage, and infrastructure fell into disrepair. Only two of the original rail yard buildings remain at the Northern end of the Point: the Car Repair Shop/Planing Mill and the Machine Shop.

But as Maine’s largest city has grown and been revitalized as a destination for tourists, creatives, immigrants, and entrepreneurs, Thompson’s Point has seen a reincarnation as a hub of creative activity: brewers, restauranteurs, designers, musicians, and makers have set up shop in the site’s once forgotten buildings. The Machine Shop has been refurbished as Brick South, a flexible multi-purpose venue that attracts a variety of events, from musical performances to trade shows to weddings and conferences. 

The Point's 2.25 million square feet of land at the burgeoning edge of the city is poised to become a new center for residential and commercial activity, with plans for a hotel, museum, recreational opportunities that take advantage of the water and trails nearby, homes, office spaces, and shared green space.

An event on Thompson’s Point is an event ahead of its time, at the edge of a vibrant new neighborhood, off the beaten path.

 

Travel

Thompson’s Point lies equidistant from the Portland International Jetport and the city center, convenient to Interstate 295, adjacent to the Amtrak Downeaster passenger train station and the Concord Coach Lines bus station with several daily routes to Boston and New York.

 

Booking

If you are interested in planning an event at Brick South or anywhere on Thompson’s Point, please fill out our Inquiry Form and we’ll be in touch about the details.

 

History

Lumber Shed, Thompson's Point - 1924

Lumber Shed, Thompson's Point - 1924

Brick South sits at the heart of Thompson’s Point, a small peninsula that juts into the Fore River at the Southern gateway to Portland, Maine. The site has a rich, industrial past centered around the shipping and railroad industries. It was the port terminus of the Cumberland and Oxford Canal in the 19th century and home of the Maine Central Railroad Shops in the early 20th; it served as a transfer point between rail cars and Portland’s busy shipyard and as a one-time state of the art hub for the repair of locomotive engines; it boasted Maine’s first electric crane.

"Nothing could work to greater satisfaction than this crane, and under his persuasion it seemed to be instinct with life, reaching down its great finger and lifting the ponderous weights as a man would move a small object to any place about a table without the slightest apparent effort and placing them to an inch just where they were desired."

A reporter from The Argus observing the Thompson's Point crane moving a twenty-four ton driving wheel lathe

September 20, 1904

The quick decline of rail and shipping led to the eventual demolition of many of the rail yard buildings. By the 1940’s, the once bustling area was relegated to industrial manufacturing and storage, and infrastructure fell into disrepair. Only two of the original rail yard buildings remain at the Northern end of the Point: the Car Repair Shop/Planing Mill and the Machine Shop.

But as Maine’s largest city has grown and been revitalized as a destination for tourists, creatives, immigrants, and entrepreneurs, Thompson’s Point has seen a reincarnation as a hub of creative activity: brewers, restauranteurs, designers, musicians, and makers have set up shop in the site’s once forgotten buildings. The Machine Shop has been refurbished as Brick South, a flexible multi-purpose venue that attracts a variety of events, from musical performances to trade shows to weddings and conferences. 

The Point's 2.25 million square feet of land at the burgeoning edge of the city is poised to become a new center for residential and commercial activity, with plans for a hotel, museum, recreational opportunities that take advantage of the water and trails nearby, homes, office spaces, and shared green space.

An event on Thompson’s Point is an event ahead of its time, at the edge of a vibrant new neighborhood, off the beaten path.

 

Travel

Machine Shop, Thompson's Point - 1924

Machine Shop, Thompson's Point - 1924

Thompson’s Point lies equidistant from the Portland International Jetport and the city center, convenient to Interstate 295, adjacent to the Amtrak Downeaster passenger train station and the Concord Coach Lines bus station with several daily routes to Boston and New York. 

 

Booking

If you are interested in planning an event at Brick South or anywhere on Thompson’s Point, please fill out our Inquiry Form and we’ll be in touch about the details.

 

History

Lumber Shed, Thompson's Point - 1924

Lumber Shed, Thompson's Point - 1924

Brick South sits at the heart of Thompson’s Point, a small peninsula that juts into the Fore River at the Southern gateway to Portland, Maine. The site has a rich, industrial past centered around the shipping and railroad industries. It was the port terminus of the Cumberland and Oxford Canal in the 19th century and home of the Maine Central Railroad Shops in the early 20th; it served as a transfer point between rail cars and Portland’s busy shipyard and as a one-time state of the art hub for the repair of locomotive engines; it boasted Maine’s first electric crane.

"Nothing could work to greater satisfaction than this crane, and under his persuasion it seemed to be instinct with life, reaching down its great finger and lifting the ponderous weights as a man would move a small object to any place about a table without the slightest apparent effort and placing them to an inch just where they were desired."

A reporter from The Argus observing the Thompson's Point crane moving a twenty-four ton driving wheel lathe

September 20, 1904

Car Repair Shop, Thompson's Point - 1924

Car Repair Shop, Thompson's Point - 1924

The quick decline of rail and shipping led to the eventual demolition of many of the rail yard buildings. By the 1940’s, the once bustling area was relegated to industrial manufacturing and storage, and infrastructure fell into disrepair. Only two of the original rail yard buildings remain at the Northern end of the Point: the Car Repair Shop/Planing Mill and the Machine Shop.

Machine Shop, Thompson's Point - 1924

Machine Shop, Thompson's Point - 1924

But as Maine’s largest city has grown and been revitalized as a destination for tourists, creatives, immigrants, and entrepreneurs, Thompson’s Point has seen a reincarnation as a hub of creative activity: brewers, restauranteurs, designers, musicians, and makers have set up shop in the site’s once forgotten buildings. The Machine Shop has been refurbished as Brick South, a flexible multi-purpose venue that attracts a variety of events, from musical performances to trade shows to weddings and conferences.


Travel

Thompson’s Point lies equidistant from the Portland International Jetport and the city center, convenient to Interstate 295, adjacent to the Amtrak Downeaster passenger train station and the Concord Coach Lines bus station with several daily routes to Boston and New York. 

 

Booking

If you are interested in planning an event at Brick South or anywhere on Thompson’s Point, please fill out our Inquiry Form and we’ll be in touch about the details.